In the News

This oddly compelling piece plays more like a social experiment in unforced compliance than theater, but it works in a way that never feels forced or hokey.
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The newly formed American Modern Opera Company, AMOC, won't ever be a typical opera company. No home. No subscribers. No overhead. Just artists. Artists looking for a way to capture their own voice, and do it authentically, with adequate preparation, and—perhaps most importantly—in collaboration, with a fluid notion of art forms and their intersection.
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[WARHOLCAPOTE has] observations in Mr. Roth’s script, largely culled from 80 hours of recorded conversations between its two characters (who both died in the 1980s), are so presciently on-target they leave you reeling.
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An ingenious, captivating world premiere at American Repertory Theater.
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Young playwright Kate Hamill is the best thing to happen to Jane Austen since Colin Firth. Her wonderfully witty and whimsical adaptations of Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility are the best stage adaptations of Austen's work to date.
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Roth spent 10 years sewing together a narrative from hours and hours of tapes, and his play, while quite funny at times, is a meditation on the toll it takes to be a celebrity artist. 
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Skillfully guided by Broadway director Michael Mayer (“Spring Awakening,” “American Idiot”), these are tour de force performances for both actors – in re-creating such well-known figures of their time and in making their relationship and thoughts seem believable and valid.
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Under Michael Mayer’s direction and starring Stephen Spinella as the Pop artist and Dan Butler as the author-raconteur, the show certainly deserves to be famous far longer than Warhol’s proclaimed 15 minutes.
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It’s mainly a chance for fans of Warhol and Capote to travel past the velvet rope and get a sense of the men as chummy co-conspirators. As fly-on-the-wall perches go, it’s a good one.
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That play was never written, but Mr. Roth has artfully assembled the actual words shared between Capote and Warhol, and formed them into five imagined conversations that make up the structure of this play. The result is a fascinating and illuminating psychological study of these two idiosyncratic geniuses.
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